The celebration of the 80th

In 2024, Normandy will honor the memory of these events and of these men and women who came from all over the world to liberate us.

 

 

The international ceremony on June 6, 2024 will take place in…

The Calvados prefecture announced on Tuesday October 17 the location of the international ceremony on June 6, 2024.

The ceremony will take place in Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer in Calvados, in the American sector, near Omaha Beach where 2,500 American soldiers lost their lives.

This ceremony will be an opportunity to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Landings and the Battle of Normandy in the presence of numerous heads of state and representatives of the belligerent nations.

As a reminder, in 2014 on the occasion of the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings, 19 heads of state were present on Ouistreham beach (Sword Beach).

Visit the Calvados Prefecture website

The celebration of the 80th

In 2024, Normandy will honor the memory of these events and of these men and women who came from all over the world to liberate us.

A regional mobilization will take place to celebrate this major ten-year anniversary. The Normandy Region will be there alongside the Normans.

The calendar of events will be available on this page from the end of 2023 then in paper version in spring 2024.

On this site you will find from 2024:

the map of all events certified by the Region
practical information around official commemorations
thematic files to take advantage of all the events
key dates of 1944
A little history

The Landing of June 6, 1944 was a decisive turning point in the Second World War: the Liberation of France and Europe began on the beaches of Normandy. It is in Normandy that the face of today’s world took shape. Since 1942, with the Dieppe Raid, the history of Normandy as a whole has been closely linked to that of the return of Liberty, Peace and Reconciliation.

On June 6, 1944 and the days that followed, thousands of young men representing around fifteen different nations and 177 Frenchmen from the Kieffer Commando landed on the Normandy beaches to liberate the territory. On June 6, at midnight, more than 150,000 allied soldiers were in Normandy, including 23,000 paratroopers and 20,000 vehicles of all sizes. 12,000 men were killed, wounded or taken prisoner. Three months of battles followed to liberate Normandy. Then it was the turn of Paris and finally of all of Europe.

Even today, through remains, cemeteries, visiting places, an emblematic Reconstruction heritage, these traces are still visible and allow this memory to be alive in Normandy. The Landing of June 6, 1944 and the Battle of Normandy are engraved in the mind of every Norman and are part of a common heritage that we have a duty to pass on.

 

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